The Knowledge Trap


One of the most important lessons we’re trying to teach our son is to value wisdom over knowledge. We live in a time where knowledge is more accessible than ever. It has become more valuable in our society than wisdom. Because of the, gone are the days of apprenticeship. Gone are the days of seeking wisdom from the elderly. Gone are the days of working your way up a ladder. 1 Corinthians 8:1 warns that knowledge puffs us up. It makes us think we are better than we are.

King Solomon had a son named Rehoboam who acceded the throne after Solomon’s death. The people came to him in 1 Kings 12 to ask him to lighten the work load that Solomon had given them for years. He went to the elderly to seek their advice. In their wisdom , they let him know that the people would be loyal if he did that. However, he spoke to his friends who did not have wisdom. They advised him to prove he was greater than his father and increase their workload. He liked their advice. In turn, the people revolted and the kingdom split. Future generations refused to live under a king from that dynasty.

Proverbs 4:7 says, “Getting wisdom is the wisest thing you can do! And whatever else you do, develop good judgment” (NLT). Wisdom is often what you get right after you need it. However, it can be gained through seeking advice from the wise, through researching history or by asking God (James 1:5). It’s good to have knowledge, but not if you don’t know how to use it wisely. In all areas of our lives we need to seek the wisdom from above rather than knowledge from the world. Don’t fall for the knowledge trap. As believers it’s critical that we gain wisdom and good judgment. If God puts a high value on wisdom, so should we since we are His representatives in this world.

Photo by Debby Hudson on Unsplash

4 Comments

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4 responses to “The Knowledge Trap

  1. Very true! I think that when youth develop a good, functioning relationship with their grandparents that it helps them to grow respectful towards others, and perhaps more humble, setting them up to be wise(er) as they mature. In schools today, it seems that many of the bad influences are fellow children; they lead each other into rather foolish situations.

    • In my son’s case, we try to be around grandparent age people with him a few times a week. He sees us modeling the behavior of learning from those who are ahead of us. He’s also learning valuable communication and listening skills.

  2. Wisdom is far more valuable than knowledge.

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