Tag Archives: being salt and light

Seasoning The World

I read an article a few years ago about a guy who went through the drive through at a Chick-fil-A in Abilene, Texas. When he picked up his order at the window, he handed the cashier ten $100 bills. The employee was shocked. They had seen people pay it forward before, but never like this. She asked him why he was doing it. He replied, “Monday’s are tough, and I want everyone to have a good day.” Because he paid it forward, they were able to give 88 customers prepaid food. Some people cried because of the blessing. Their day had been rough and this gesture turned it around. One act of blessing made a world of difference in people’s lives.

In Matthew 14, John the Baptist had been killed. Jesus wanted to be alone to mourn His cousin, but people followed Him. Instead of getting mad, He healed their sick and taught them truths. All day long, the crowd grew until there were thousands. By evening, the disciples were ready to disperse the crowd to send them away to eat. Jesus told them to feed the crowd. They knew it would cost more money and food than they had. They looked around and found a boy with fives loaves and two fish. Jesus blessed them, broke them and had the disciples serve them. After feeding the crowd with it, Jesus had the disciples go pick up the leftovers so nothing would be wasted. Over 5,000 people were blessed that day by the boy’s generosity.

In Matthew 5:13 Jesus said, “Let me tell you why you are here. You’re here to be salt-seasoning that brings out the God-flavors of this earth. If you lose your saltiness, how will people taste godliness? You’ve lost your usefulness and will end up in the garbage” (MSG). Each day we have several opportunities to eave a good taste in their mouth about Godard Christians. You may not have a $1,000 to give, but you have something. God can take whatever you’re willing to give and multiply it in someone’s life in order to bless them. It can be words of life, lunch or anything God puts on your heart. We have to quit thinking about what we don’t have and think about the interaction and how they will see God through us. Go out today looking to bring out the God-flavors in this world. You never know what miracle you will see or what impact it will have.

Photo by Max Kleinen on Unsplash

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Seasoning With Salt

There’s a saying that says, “Always leave them wanting more.” When teaching people this principle, I like to tell the story of something that happened a couple of years ago. I was riding with my friend in his truck on a rainy day. As we were going down the road, we saw a guy carrying a duffle bag walking on the shoulder. He was getting soaked and we thought the Christian thing to do was to pick him up. He put the duffle bag in the bed of the truck where it was still getting rained on, and climbed in the back seat. My buddy told him he could bring it inside, but he declined. As we we driving, he asked him what was in the bag. The man said sternly, “It’s none of your business!” Shocked, I said, “You don’t have to be rude about it. We just wanted to make sure it wasn’t going to get messed up.” He repeated himself with even more attitude. My buddy pulled the truck over and told him to get out. Before he could grab the bag, we sped off!

On the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus said, “Your lives are like salt among the people. But if you, like salt, become bland, how can your ‘saltiness’ be restored? Flavorless salt is good for nothing and will be thrown out and trampled on by others” (Matthew 5:13 TPT). Salt brings out incredible flavors in food, and it also makes you thirsty. If there’s too much, it makes the food inedible. If there’s too little, or you can’t taste it, what’s the point. The question my wife and I ask all the time is, “Did you leave them thirsting for more?” As people explore faith or are around us as Christians, that’s the question we have to ask. Did our conversation, and the way we acted, make them want to know more about God?

Colossians 4:5-6 says, “Live wisely among those who are not believers, and make the most of every opportunity. Let your conversation be gracious and attractive so that you will have the right response for everyone” (NLT). The word “attractive” means seasoned with salt. We need to make sure we’re interacting with people who don’t know Jesus so we can be salt and light. There’s little point to salt or light unless you’re around unseasoned people in the dark. Jesus didn’t spend all His time in the Temple or only with believers. He made a point to be among people who didn’t believe in God, taught them in ways they could understand and left them wanting more. We need to ask God daily for wisdom in how to live, speak and act in front of non-believers so that we make them thirsty to know more about Him. We will know it’s the right amount when they ask for more.

Photo by Jason Tuinstra on Unsplash

P.S. I know you’re dying to know what was in the bag, and it’s none of your business. 😉😂

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Foolish Arguments

I used to love listening to talk radio. There was a local guy that I enjoyed listening to, but one day he switched his format. Instead of merely discussing news events, he decided to bring divisive topics each day and just let people argue. His show began to be about stirring up a hornets nest where no one could win, and it caused people to dig their heels into their position. It was no longer a place for dialogue and the show became something I no longer wanted to listen to. I’m guessing I wasn’t alone because it was canceled not long after that.

As Christians, we need to be careful that we don’t fall into that same trap. We don’t want to be known as people who argue over every little thing, especially to the point where we refuse to listen. At times, it feels like our goal is to win the argument rather than to win the lost. It’s one thing to have a dialogue with someone about why you believe what you believe, but another thing entirely to look for divisive arguments with others. We’re to be known for our love rather than our debating skills.

Paul warned Timothy about this in 2 Timothy 2:23-24. He said, “Again I say, don’t get involved in foolish, ignorant arguments that only start fights. A servant of the Lord must not quarrel but must be kind to everyone, be able to teach, and be patient with difficult people” (NLT). That’s a challenge for you and me in today’s world. Everyone seems to be divided on everything, even in the Church. We’re not to go around and start fights, but to find a way to teach people the truth in a way that they’ll listen. What good is it if we win the argument, but lose the war for their soul? When we start from a place of love rather than trying to be right, we’ll find more open doors to share our faith.

Photo by Jason Rosewell on Unsplash

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